The Late Antique Minas Tirith - a Story of a Remarkable Object

We start, as befits the period, *in medias res*. In 435 Theodoric I, rightly judging that the Romans will be busy fighting with the Franks on the Rhine, rushed to lay siege on Narbonne, a crucial city in the south of Gaul. His plans were foiled as the siege was lifted by Litorius, *magister militum per Gallias* with the help of the Huns. We have a brief poetic depiction of that scene by Sidonius Apollinaris, a 5th century poet, diplomat and bishop.
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The Strange and Terrifying Case of the Turboslav Empire

Not that long ago and not far away, around 2014, a weird trend started to appear in the Polish blogosphere. A bunch of people began to write about the semi-mythical Empire of the Sarmatians that stretched from the Rhine to Novgorod. Sort of Erich von Däniken (and yes, aliens do make an appearance) with a Slavic take. The internet is full of such nonsense, right? Nothing to worry about, right? Well...
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The Obama Moment of Anglo-Saxon Studies?

Before you think that this is going to be an overly optimistic article full of happy slogans, think again. You remember that Guantanamo thing that was supposed to be closed? It still runs. Or how the US were not supposed to bomb people anymore? Still do. No new wars? Well, you know... Nevertheless a lot of good things happened, too. Thus, when I say Obama moment I mean a moment full of potential and full of hope for the future. If it comes into fruition is to be seen.
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Towards academic communism. A naive proposal (with footnotes)

The academic system is broken. There is a lot of talk about revolutions of various kinds in academia: open access, digital and so on. All of them are important and will, in time, change the way the field looks. Maybe I am a bit naive but I really believe it. The problem is: it will take years if not decades before it happens. Academia is political. Every research is political. Therefore, maybe, we should look for solutions also in the realm of politics.
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Collaborative Narratives and Flipped Maps

During the IMC Book Fair I have spent an astonishing sum of three pounds on a battered copy of Philip Whitting's Byzantium. An Introduction. Why, you may ask? It is fairly outdated, very cursory, short and has been out of print for at least thirty years. If you google it you will find just a couple of references to it. For anybody who has Ostrogorsky's History of the Byzantine State on the shelf it can only be seen as a handy introduction to students (if even that).
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Public Medievalism in the trenches

For some of us this years IMC has been dominated by the #publicmedievalism. We live in dangerous times indeed. Middle Ages were never innocent and have always been highly contested, but in the last years they have become a battleground characterised by particular ferocity of fighting.
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Late Antique and Early Medieval discussions in Mainz

The University of Mainz and the Römisch-Germanisches Zentralmuseum in Mainz hosted on the weekend of the 19-21 of May the Workshop of the Graduate Exchange in Late Antique, Byzantine and Medieval History. I had the chance to participate for the first time and as it was a splendid occasion that prompted many interesting discussions and insights.
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Give me my history back!

On IMC 2016 one of the most interesting discussions happened after a session devoted to the fate of refugees in the Late Roman and Early Medieval World. You can check the abstracts out here but what drove the whole session home was a talk afterwards.

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